REVOLT, THEY SAID.
a project by Andrea Geyer. 2012 - ongoing
INSTALLATIONS
TEXTS
ABOUT

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
BIOGRAPHIES OF WOMEN NAMED / LAST NAMES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
Alice Yancey was a member of the Utopia Neighborhood Club, a Harlem-based women’s social service organization. She directed the interracial staff of the Utopia Children’s Center, a progressive daycare center in Harlem.

Enid Yandell (1870–1934) was considered one of the leading sculptors in New York at the turn of the century. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, she went on to work on the caryatids for the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 and won a Designers Medal for her work there. Her sculptures dealt with literary and philosophical ideas, such as the Carrie Brown Memorial Fountain in Providence, Rhode Island, which she described as a depiction of the triumph of intellectuality and spirituality. She worked on many other memorials and became one of the first women to join the National Sculpture Society. Yandell’s work was also included in the 1913 Armory Show. She was devoted to improving the lives of others, founding an art school on Martha’s Vineyard in 1908, then joining the Red Cross during World War I. Her activities during the war took up most of her time, at which point she largely abandoned her sculpture practice.

Rose Emmet Young (1869–1941) was a novelist, short story writer, and leader of the suffrage movement. As an author she published numerous titles including Sally of Missouri (1903); Henderson (1903); Murder at Mason’s (1927); and The Record of the Leslie Woman Suffrage Commission (1929). She also collaborated with Carrie Chapman Catt and Eleanor Roosevelt on the book Why Wars Must Cease (1953). Between 1906 and 1907 Young’s short stories “Petticoat Push,” “With Reluctant Feet,” and “The Substance of Things Hoped For,” were published in Harper’s Bazaar. Young was vocal about her views and the importance of female equality; speaking at public forum in 1914 she noted: “To me feminism means that woman wants to develop her own womanhood. It means that she wants to push to the finest, fullest, and freest expression of herself. . . . [I]t means the finding of her own soul.”

Maude Younger (1870–1936) was an activist raised in California who fought for women’s suffrage, legislation protecting working-class women, and the Equal Rights Amendment, which remains unpassed. After a wealthy upbringing, Younger visited the New York City College Settlement to experience life in the working-class. She stayed for five years, becoming involved with trade unions and working as a waitress. After returning to California she lobbied for the eight-hour workday and woman’s suffrage. This led to her involvement with the Congressional Union ran by Alice Paul and speaking engagements across the United States on behalf of women’s suffrage. After the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave white women the right to vote, she turned her efforts to the Equal Rights Amendment. Her unpublished autobiography can be found in the National Woman’s Party Papers at the Library of Congress.

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